CPC working group declares immediate need for two hires for Asian American studies program

A decades-long push for an Asian American studies (AAS) program made significant inroads on Thursday, when a working group formed by the Curricular Planning Committee (CPC) announced its recommendation that at least two new faculty be hired for the expansion of AAS at the College, concluding that “a program cannot be formed with current faculty resources.” In its report, the working group, composed of both students and faculty, announced strong support for an AAS program, laying out arguments for its merits and a framework for its implementation at the College. The working group, which was assembled in October 2018 and has been meeting weekly since, was charged by the CPC with “respond[ing] to questions about future possibilities for Asian American studies: curricular development, structures for a possible program, staffing implications, and so on,” according to the report.

Members for ad hoc free speech committee announced

On Jan. 30, President Maud Mandel released the list of members on the committee formed in the wake of last semester’s campus conversation around free expression, hateful speech and the Chicago Principles. 

Mandel created the Ad Hoc Committee on Inquiry and Inclusion with the charge of recommending, by this May, a set of guidelines for future speaker invitations.

Students, faculty discuss free speech

On Oct. 29, several members of the faculty sent out a petition calling for the College to adopt the Chicago Statement on Principles of Free Expression, originally released by the University of Chicago in July 2012.

Ballot Questions 2 and 3 pass, 1 fails, incumbents reelected

Yesterday, Massachusetts voters decided on three ballot initiatives that appeared on their ballots alongside candidates for governor, senator and congressperson, among other offices. With 27 percent reporting, results showed voters overwhelmingly in favor of Question 2, which created a Citizens Commission to address the Citizens United Supreme Court case, and Question 3, which reaffirmed an anti-discrimination ordinance for transgender individuals.

One in Two Thousand: Aidan Dunkelberg ’22

When I first met Aidan during his audition for Frosh Revue, I was instantly struck by his zaniness and his relentlessly positive energy. Last week, I caught up with him about his life in Mississippi, his violin and mandolin skills and his interest in nude modeling.

JAs react to new system, larger entries

Last year, the Junior Advisor (JA) system underwent significant changes. Due to gradual decreases in both applications and in students accepting the position, the Junior Advisor Advisory Board (JAAB) changed the standard entry format from having two JAs responsible for approximately 20 to 25 first-years to having three or four JAs responsible for approximately 30 to 50 first-years.