The Williams Record

This Week in Williams History: Vietnam, dance marathons, and microcomputers

This Week in Williams History: Vietnam, dance marathons, and microcomputers

Dover Sikes April 14, 2021
“This Week in Williams History” is a column dedicated to looking back at memorable moments in the College’s past through articles in the Record. This week in history, the College dealt with draft deferment, hosted dance marathons, and invested in computer technology.
Chad Topaz explores cultural and social issues with QSIDE. (Photo courtesy of Chad Topaz.)

Spotlight on Research: Chad Topaz quantitatively explores social inequalities with QSIDE

Cooper Desmond April 14, 2021
Professor of Mathematics Chad Topaz and his colleagues at the Institute for the Quantitative Study of Inclusion, Diversity, and Equity (QSIDE) use quantitative evidence to explore cultural and social issues. QSIDE conducts its research in five main categories: criminal justice, arts and media, education equity, healthcare equity, and environmental justice. 
(Kent Barbir/The Williams Record)

One in Two Thousand: Shenba Vairavan ’24

Kent Barbir April 14, 2021
This week, the computer (using a script in R) chose Shenba Vairavan ’24, who talked about dancing, high school podcasts, and her first snowfall.
(Lulu Whitmore/The Williams Record)

How frats persisted for decades after they were banned

Irene Loewenson April 7, 2021
The Record has traced several threads of post-1970 fraternity activity, from the relocation of fraternities to Vermont, to the emergence of a fraternity-like club in the 1980s, to the existence of a secret fraternity through perhaps the present day.
Professor Janneke Van de Stadt at home in Mass. (Photo courtesy of Janneke Van de Stadt.)

Finding home abroad: International professors reflect on their journeys to the College

Hikaru Hayakawa and Dover Sikes April 7, 2021
Van de Stadt is not alone in her multinational background. Before settling in Massachusetts, many other members of the College’s faculty lived, learned, and worked in countries around the world. 
Peter Miles ’24 (right) spends time with friends Andrew Nachamkin ’24 (left) and Frances Hayward ’24 (back) during a late-night study session. (Photo courtesy of Peter Miles.)

‘I was hesitant then, but now I’m not’: First-years reflect on approaching two months on campus

Fiona Seibert and Lindsay Wang April 7, 2021
One month ago, the Record spoke with six formerly remote first-years about their fears, expectations, and hopes about stepping onto campus for the first time. Since then, they’ve adjusted to the rhythm of college life, embracing both the expected and the unexpected as they found how they fit into the College community. 
(Tali Natter/The Williams Record)

One in Two Thousand: Riley Galizio ’24

Tali Natter April 7, 2021
This week, the computer (using a script in R) chose Riley Galizio ’24, who talked about Taylor Swift, learning Italian, and ice hockey.
A seder plate with symbolic foods, each of which represent parts of the Passover story. (Photo courtesy of Rosa Kirk-Davidoff ’21.)

Students celebrate a second pandemic-era Passover

Alejandro Fuentes April 7, 2021
This year, the Jewish holiday of Passover (known in Hebrew as Pesach) began on the evening of Saturday, March 27 and lasted until the evening of Sunday, April 4. Students celebrating at the College faced unique challenges in observing the occasion.
Though the Atlanta shootings catapulted the issue of anti-Asian violence into the national consciousness, incidents of racialized violence toward Asians and Asian Americans, especially women, are not uncommon in American history. (Angela Gui/The Williams Record. Photo courtesy of History.com.)

‘A larger history of racialized and gendered violence’: Professors, students discuss anti-Asian hate

Lindsay Wang and Justin Zen March 31, 2021
Asian Americans have long been subject to racist dehumanization and othering, professors who spoke to the Record say, which expressed itself during the Atlanta shootings. Incidents of racialized violence toward Asians and Asian Americans, especially women, are not uncommon in American history.
Seven sophomores picked into Mission this semester. From left to right: Brian Hernandez ’23, Mariana Hernandez ’23, Shiara Pyrrhus ’23, Hector Hernandez ’23, Kenneth Chiu ’23, Karla Mercedes ’23, and Morin Tinubu ’23. (Photo courtesy of Karla Mercedes.)

A re-entry experience: Non-JA upperclass students live in first-year housing

Bellamy Richardson March 31, 2021
Due to this year’s pod system, some JAs chose to pull in non-JA, non-first-year friends to live in their pods. Additionally, other non-JA upperclass students — who were remote in the fall like Karla Mercedes '23 — were able to pick into some unoccupied rooms in Mission.
Alex J. Kim ’24 (left) and Alex J. Kim ’24 (right) have navigated a freshman year of misdirected emails and confused entrymates. (Joey Fox/The Williams Record)

The perks and perils of sharing a name

Joey Fox March 31, 2021
For three glorious years at the College, I, Joey Fox ’21, got to be unique just like everybody else. Then Joe Fox ’24 arrived.
(Annie Lu/The Williams Record)

One in Two Thousand: Andrew Thai ’21

Annie Lu March 31, 2021
This week, the computer (using a script in R) chose Andrew Thai ’21, who talked about marimba mishaps, speaking Hungarian, and Legos.
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