Category: Opinions

Grades devalued with inflation at Williams

On a shelf above Bart Simpson’s bed, there sits a trophy with the inscription “Everybody-Gets-A-Trophy Day.”

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Soft core best for Williams community

Whether a core curriculum is seen as an asset or an obstacle depends on how we imagine higher education.

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Central courses taught in philosophy

I was flattered to discover that a course I am offering next semester, “Nietzsche’s French Receptions,” was the only one in the entire catalog singled out for discussion in last week’s debate on the pros and cons of a core curriculum.

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New Congress must tackle the real issues facing America

This week’s mid-term elections were certainly a wake-up call for many in Washington. In a rejection of decades of historical precedence, the American people delivered their verdict on the Republican controlled 105th Congress.

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Campus action required on alcohol issues

A visitor to campus this past Saturday evening would have been amazed to see the amount of activity.

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Freedom needed when selecting courses

In reading over last week’s page of student opinions, I was struck by how immediately the simple prospect of a “core curriculum” opened out into a much larger set of questions regarding the means and goals of education itself.

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Core disallows academic freedom

Many colleges around the country feel that prescribing a core curriculum helps their students obtain a more well rounded college education. Classes in core curriculums generally include science, math, social science, and English classes.

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Better publicity, attendance needed at debates

Wednesday’s Blair Debate served as a reminder of how Williams can simultaneously succeed and fail at bringing speakers to campus.

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Williams a place of opportunity

What makes a Williams education is the amount of freedom available in choosing one’s courses. The actual system serves this purpose very well.

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Student contests lack of coherent core

The “Great Books” debate is often construed as the political agenda of William Bennett ’65 and friends, who wish to inculcate virtue and save America from its moral turpitude. When placed in such a context, the debate is rightly seen as having to do more with politics and less with pedagogy.

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