Students and alumni win 14 Fulbright grants for international work, research

May 6, 2015 by Emma Zehner, Executive Editor

From L to R, first row: Alexandra Highet ’13, Lani Willmar ’15, Maryanne Rodriguez ’15, Katherine Buoymaster ’15, Samuel Jeong ’14, Jennifer Helinek ’15, Charlotte Fleming ’15. Second row: Tara Miller ’15, Julia Damion ’15, Michael Neubauer ’15, Scott Wieman ’14, Kelsey Roggensack ’13, Claire Lidston ’15. Not pictured: Jaimee Comstock-Skipp M.A. ’12. Photos courtesy of pictured.

From left to right, first row: Alexandra Highet ’13, Lani Willmar ’15, Maryanne Rodriguez ’15, Katherine Buoymaster ’15, Samuel Jeong ’14, Jennifer Helinek ’15, Charlotte Fleming ’15. Second row: Tara Miller ’15, Julia Damion ’15, Michael Neubauer ’15, Scott Wieman ’14, Kelsey Roggensack ’13, Claire Lidston ’15. Not pictured: Jaimee Comstock-Skipp M.A. ’12. Photos courtesy of pictured.

This year, 14 College students received Fulbright grants. Ten students and alumni will serve as English Teaching Assistants (ETAs) outside of the United States. The other four students were awarded one-year grants to conduct research in other countries.

The 2015 recipients are Katherine Buoymaster ’15 (Turkey), Jaimee Comstock-Skipp M.A. ’12 (Tajikistan), Julia Damion ’15 (Taiwan), Charlotte Fleming ’15 (Taiwan), Jennifer Helinek ’15 (Czech Republic), Alexandra Highet ’13 (Turkey), Samuel Jeong ’14 (Taiwan), Tara Miller ’15 (Norway), Michael Neubauer ’15 (South Korea), Maryanne Rodriguez ’15 (Turkey), Kelsey Roggensack ’13 (Indonesia), Lani Willmar ’15 (Slovak Republic), Claire Lidston ’15 (Norway) and Scott Wieman ’14 (Finland).

According to Lynn Chick, fellowships coordinator, 55 College students submitted applications, which were due in September. In addition to the accepted students, several others were finalists or are currently alternates.     

Willmar is one of the 10 recipients who will be an ETA next year. She will be studying in the Slovak Republic in a small village called Rakovice with a population of about 500 people. She will be working as an ETA at a high school, Stedna odborna skola Rakovice (Secondary vocational agriculture school in Racovice), that specializes in agriculture trade studies.

“It’s going to be a perfect transition from the rural, small school setting that Williams has offered me for four years and I hope to be well integrated into the community there,” Willmar said.

Helinek will also be teaching English. She will be in a town called Třebíč in the Czech Republic where she will work at a technical school.

“I’m hoping to incorporate creative writing into my lessons; I have experience working with teens in creative writing workshops, and I think that playing with the language you’re learning helps you to relax about making mistakes and to enjoy yourself,” Helinek said.        

Miller will be conducting research on the effects of climate change in arctic spring ecosystems in Norway under the supervision of Dr. Jutta Kapfer at the Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute.

“I hypothesize that Norwegian spring ecosystems will serve as indicators of climate change, as evidence by species and water quality data, and to be elucidated by comparison with similar long-term datasets from Germany and Finland,” Miller said.

Founded in 1946, the Fulbright grant program is funded by the State Department and provides scholarships in teaching and research.

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