Closer to spring, one snow day at a time

When considering which school to choose around this time last year as a high school senior, weather was not a major concern for me. But, little did I know, Williamstown would challenge how important I considered weather. One of the greatest transitions Williams students make is the transition to the weather in the beautiful Berkshires. Foreign to many students, the snowfall in October was the beginning of a typical Williamstown winter experience. Now, for the past few months, students have weathered extreme elements for the great pleasure of attending classes. For many days, “cold” could barely suffice to describe the feeling when you stepped through the door and your toasty face received that first whip of gusty wind. These days, students share the feeling of stress from impending deadlines. But instead of spending an extra 10 minutes layering before classes, students can relax in the sunlight.

Before coming to Williams, I took for granted the year-round sun and generally pleasant weather of South Carolina. The overcast sky that seldom allows the sun to peak through the depressing gray clouds had more of an effect on me than I thought it would here. Now with the snow melting and the grass beginning to show, everyone seems happier. A few weeks ago, the snow was melting but was only clearing out for another winter storm. Though it is possible that nature is just being a tease, I would like to think that the winter is finally coming to a close. It seems like it was so long ago that students soaked in the rays and napped on Paresky lawn.

Williamstown has a vast variety of weather that seems to change in the blink of an eye, especially when you decide to take an afternoon nap, later to wake up to a drastic change in weather. But, I would never trade it for the incredibly humid never-ending summers back home. Spring recess is not far off, and warmer weather would be a great welcome back after recovering from weeks of papers and midterms. Even if there is more snow to come, we are closer to spring than we were yesterday.

Lauren Zachary ’12