Preview of the Class of ’07

As of last Friday, the Admissions Office had received 505 deposits for students of the Class of 2007.

With hopes for a class of 525 students, Admissions is currently offering positions to a few students on the waitlist.

Of the 5,338 that applied, Admissions accepted 1,092, which is 29 students fewer than last year. The number of students actually attending is down as well, as about 565 students had sent in deposits at this point last year.

“We’re in a great position to be able to add from the waitlist to reach the size of the class plus a little cushion for summer melt,” said Dick Nesbitt, director of Admissions.

There are currently between 300 and 400 students on the active waitlist, about 35 to 40 of which will be offered admission.

Nesbitt explained that the Admissions Office typically looks to see if there are any voids in the class and then looks to fill them with students off the waitlist.

Likewise, there is no rank or order on the waitlist; rather, the committee reexamines the entire group to make a selection.

This year, a lower percentage of international students accepted than was expected, so a large number of students accepted off the waitlist may be international. “[We] didn’t yield as well with international students so this gives the opportunity to lean a bit in that direction,” said Nesbitt, who also mentioned that using the waitlist “gives you an opportunity to shape the class which you can’t do if you oversubscribe.”

Nesbitt also described the academic quality of the class as “excellent,” with average SAT scores at 708 verbal and 702 math. These totals are only slightly below the averages for the entire body of accepted students for the class of 2007, which held averages of 719 verbal and 715 math.

The body of the current Class of 2007 also includes 52 blacks, 44 Latinos, 56 Asian-Americans, one Native-American and 23 international students. Students were likewise admitted from countries such as Bangladesh, Lithuania, Nigeria and Poland, which are not represent by the current student body.

The group of accepted students also includes 131 students with athletic attributes (about 70 of whom were tips), 56 students with musical attributes, 22 who participated in regionally significant social service and 15 students accomplished in the fields of theater and dance.

Currently the preliminary matriculation rate is 46 percent, as 505 of 1,092 sent in deposits.

However, these numbers vary slightly amongst the special interest groups. Athletically talented students seem more likely to choose Williams, as 54 percent of those offered admission accepted.

Students with musical attributes and those with experience in social service seem to matriculate according to the larger rate, with 44 percent of musically tagged accepted students attending and 41 percent of those tagged for social service accepting.

American minority students also committed to Williams in a similar manner, with 40 percent of those offered admission accepting.

Theatrically talented students and international students accepted at a rate below the norm, however, with 32 percent of theater students and 36 percent of international students agreeing to attend.

The final figures for the Class of 2007 will not be available until the fall, as a percentage of students typically choose at the last minute to take a year off or to accept an offer at another institution.

Nesbitt mentioned Harvard and Amherst as two other peer colleges using their waitlists this year, whose decisions could impact some of the students currently planning to attend the College.