College gives Bicentennial Awards, honors members of Williams community

President of the College Harry C. Payne presented seven of the College’s Bicentennial Medals at a private ceremony on April 24.

The Bicentennial Medals, established in 1993 on the occasion of the College’s twentieth anniversary, honor members of the Williams community for distinguished achievement in any field of endeavor.

The honorees are:

Lisa C. Capaldini, AIDS physician in San Francisco

Capaldini practices medicine in the Castro District of San Francisco, working mostly with people with HIV/AIDS. She lectures about primary care treatment of AIDS and its psychiatric and spiritual components as well and about medical ethics.

Stephen Case, CEO of America Online

Case, class of 1980, co-founded AOL in 1985 and led it to its current dominant position as an online service.

He has steered the company through a number of market challenges to establish dramatic growth. Five years ago AOL linked one million households and generated $30 million in revenue; by 1997 it was 10 million households and $1.7 billion in revenue.

William Finn, Tony Award-winning playwright, composer and lyricist

Finn, class of 1974, wrote the music lyrics and book for In Trousers (1979), March of the Falsettos (1981) and Falsettoland (1991). These were later put together for a run on Broadway under the title Falsettos.

The trilogy tells the story of a family and how it changes when the husband and father falls in love with a man

George D. Kennedy, business and civic leader

A member of the Class of 1948, George Kennedy served as president, then chairman of International Minerals and Chemicals, which later became Mallinckrodt Group Inc. Both Fortune 250 companies. Earlier he was president of Brown Co., a pulp and paper producer, and president of Nationwide Papers, a subsidiary of Champion International.

Richard Moe, president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation

After graduating from Williams class of 1959, Richard Moe returned to his native Minnesota to start a career in public service. He began as a volunteer in the 1960 senate campaign of Hubert Humphrey and quickly advanced to top administrative jobs with the mayor of Minneapolis and the lieutenant governor of Minnesota.

He served as chairman of the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party before moving to Washington in 1972 to head Senator Walter Mondale’s staff. He eventually became vice-president Mondale’s chief of staff and a member of the Carter White House senior staff.

Frank O. Richards, technical director of the Global 2000 River Blindness Program

For the past decade Frank Richards has fought the disease known as River Blindness — a tropical parasitic infection that causes blindness and skin disease and affects 38 countries in Africa, the Middle East and the Americas.

He has supervised programs that have administered 10 million treatments of the drug Ivermectin (donated for this purpose by Merck & Co.) to more than five million people. His work has contributed to the disease being halted in parts of four countries — Mexico, Guatemala, Ecuador and Colombia. If this result can be sustained for 10 years, the disease will be eradicated from these areas.

Martha A.Williamson, executive producer of the television series Touched by an Angel and Promised Land

Martha Williamson’s Touched by an Angel and Promised Land are among the most watched and critically praised programs on television. They are particularly noted for pioneering the treatment of religious themes in prime time.

Touched by an Angel, with more than 20 million viewers per week, chronicles how three angels touch the lives of people struggling in some way with life and in a variety of ways bring the message that God loves them. In Promised Land, an unemployed construction worker and his family travel the country in a trailer looking for work and for opportunities to do good.